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Clean Instructions

Quilt Care & Maintenance:

It is very important to care and maintain your Hammock Gear quilts to ensure they will keep warm and protected for many years to come.  The information below will help you keep them clean and instruct you on their proper use and storage, ensuring that you get the most enjoyment and longest life out of your gear.

 

Cleaning

It is very important that you NEVER dry clean your Hammock Gear quilts.  Dry cleaning strips goose down of its natural, protective oils and clogs the pores of most technical fabrics.  If someone else is washing your gear,  make sure they understand the importance of using the appropriate methods.

 

Small stains

  • Use any mild, non-detergent soap

  • Shift the down away from the soiled area and, using a clean cloth saturated with soapy water, gently scrub the stain until it fades or is gone

  • Remove the soap residue with a clean, damp cloth

  • Be sure the area is dry before it is returned to storage

 

Machine Washing

  • NEVER use a top-loading washer with an agitator as they are likely to damage your quilt. Use only a front loading washing machine...the bigger the better

  • Follow the directions on recommended cleaning products such as McNett ReviveX Down Cleaner, Nikwax Down Wash, and “Zero” by Woolite. They are formulated to clean and restore the loft to your quilt while preserving the natural oils in goose down

  • Never use bleach (or bleach alternative) or fabric softener during any part of the cleaning process

  • Use the Gentle, cold water cycle, using a cold water rinse

  • To eliminate any residual soap, complete a second cycle with water only

  • At this point it is crucial that you handle your now heavier, wet, and more delicate quilt CAREFULLY.  Lifting, as opposed to pulling, is the preferred method to remove the quilt from the washing machine.  NEVER wring the quilt out.

 

Hand Washing

  • Fill a bathtub with cold water

  • Follow the directions on recommended cleaning products such as McNett ReviveX Down Cleaner, Nikwax Down Wash, and “Zero” by Woolite. They are formulated to clean and restore the loft to your quilt while preserving the natural oils in goose down.

  • Gently work the water into the quilt with a kneading motion.  Get out as much air as possible. Let it soak for 20 min then do gently work it again.

  • Let the water out of the bathtub and gently rinse using the same process.  Continue this process until there are no more soap bubbles and the water runs clear.

  • At this point it is crucial that you handle your, now heavier, wet quilt CAREFULLY.  Lifting, as opposed to pulling, is the preferred method to remove the quilt from the washing machine.  NEVER wring the quilt out.

 

Drying

The last step of cleaning a quilt is typically the most time consuming.  The more down insulation you quilt has, the longer it is going to take to dry. Sometimes a couple of hours or more.  While this step tends to take the longest, it is very important that it is done properly.  Cutting corners here will result in a quilt with noticeably less loft.  Again, care should be given during this stage.

  • Use a front loading dryer (the bigger the better)

  • If using a public facility, inspect the inside of the machine for anything that might damage your quilt. This includes items left in the dryer or any burrs  that could potentially snag your quilt.

  • Carefully move the quilt from the washing machine to the dryer being sure to lift the quilt. To avoid the risk of damaging your gear, do not move a wet quilt by pulling.

  • Use the lowest heat setting available.  Confirm that the temperature selector is accurate before use. If the dryer is unfamiliar, it should be checked periodically during the drying process to make sure it is not melting the fabric.

  • Throw in a couple of tennis balls or “dryer balls” with the quilt and start the first drying cycle. Depending on the size of the quilt, it will take a number of cycles to complete the drying process.

  • It will be necessary to periodically inspect the quilt and manually break up clumps of goose down. It is important to do it throughout the drying process because the dryer the clumps become, the harder they are to break up.

 

Long Term Storage

Do not store the quilt in the provided stuff sack. The stuff sack is meant for use during hiking/camping trips in which the quilt is likely to be taken out on a nightly basis. Ideally, the quilt should be stored fully lofted in a clean, dry environment.  Hanging in a closet or stored in an oversized pillow case are good storage solutions. It is important to make sure the quilt is completely dry before it is put away for storage. The most efficient way to dry a slightly damp quilt is in the open air (avoid direct sunlight if possible).  If the quilt was exposed to any significant moisture, it should be inspected for any loss of loft that might be the result of clumping.  Refer to the instructions for washing/drying if needed.